GOT AN IRISH CHARACTER IN YOUR UPCOMING NOVEL?

What’s cheaper than an airfair and a three week stay at a hotel to research the Irish? My blog.

Since I’ve been living in Ireland for almost two years now, I might as well help out a fellow writer. I’ll update this page as often as I can.


Dialog for the Irish.

The Irish speak (mainly) English, but these following safe slang words or phrases are what I hear on an average day. Other slang words and phrases you see on other websites shouln’t be used. You might sound like a fool.

Quick note: While it may be tempting to replace the word you for yer – don’t do it.

Craic
Means fun
“Me and the lads are heading out for a craic.”
“What’s the craic?”
“Any craic?”

Eejit
We all know this means idiot.

Grand
Means I’m good, I’m great, That sounds good, that sounds great
“How have you been?” “Grand.”
“I’m grand, how are you?”
“That’s grand.”

Howya
Means hi, how are you, greetings.

Yoke
Basicly refering to an object
“Grab that yoke from the coffee table, will you?”

Yer man – Yer Wan/Won
Refering to a certain man
“Yer man is getting married.”
Yer man over there can give you directions.”

Cop on
This one is my favourite.
Means to become aware of something.
For example, when you say something ignorant to an Irish person, they might say, “cop on.”

Taytos
An Irish crisps brand, but the Irish usually refer to all potato crisps as Taytos.

Hoover
Again, an Irish brand of vacuum cleaner, but the Irish usually refer to all vacuum cleaners as a hoover. “Grab the hoover.” On this note, the Irish don’t know what a broom is, and refer to it as a brush.


Places to live in Ireland


Ireland’s Weather

Ireland, where everyday is like six o’clock in the morning.

Cold, windy, raining, cold, windy, raining, cold, windy raining, always cold, always raining, always windy.

During the winter time, wind storms are common. Some of them have even knocked down my fence.

It rains a lot. In fact no matter how dark the skies are, or how many jumpers (sweaters) you need to wear, when it’s not raining it’s referred to being a nice day.

It does not snow a lot, and when it does it usually lasts no longer than a few minutes and is accompanied by rain, so the snow usually melts away. A blanket of thick snow covering the ground happens a few times every other year.

The night air can get to freezing temperatures where lakes, ponds, and puddles become ice and the ground is covered by pure, white frost.

Summer time is tropical, which explains why Ireland is so green, with mild to above average humidity.

They call three days of 25 degrees Celsius a heat wave. I’m not kidding when I tell you they walk around shirtless with ice cream cones and sunbrun on their chests while I’m still wearing jumpers and hugging my body.


 

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